Gardeners and Nature lovers already appreciate the botanical wonders around us, but plants are more than floral beauties. We owe the air we breathe to them, all of our food, and most of our medicine, chemicals and housing. Animals from elephants to ants depend on plant-life. And the world's flora has an equally intimate relationship with the birds, insects, mammals and humans around them. Explore these relationships and find the latest botany discoveries through the links below. Check out the categories in the menu or try the search using the magnifying glass above.
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“Carnivorous” Plant Also Likes Salads

Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well. The aquatic carnivorous bladderwort, which can be found in many lakes and ponds worldwide, does not only gain profit from eating little animals but also by consuming algae and pollen grains. This results in survival in aquatic habitats where prey animals are rare, and in increased fitness if the animals and algae are caught in a well-balanced diet.

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Herbarium Specimens Help Document Increasing Air Polution

From this study, we can conclude that urban activities in Valencia have substantially raised levels of Cr, Ni and Cd in the urban atmosphere, which consequently increased atmospheric deposition due to changes in human activities over more than 70years of urban growth

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Deforestation Changes Global Weather Patterns (Not A Global Warming Story)

Tropical deforestation delivers a double whammy to the climate–and to farmers. Most people know that climate change is a dangerous global problem, and that it’s caused by pumping carbon into the atmosphere. But it turns out that removing forests alters moisture and air flow, leading to changes–from fluctuating rainfall patterns to rises in temperatures–that are just as hazardous, and happen right away. The impacts go beyond the tropics–the United Kingdom and Hawaii could see an increase in rainfall while the US Midwest and Southern France could see a decline.”

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Plants Re-Set Their Seeds’ Germination Based On Climate Experience

If the mother experiences warmer temperatures, it produces more of a protein called Flowering Locus T (FT) which represses production of tannins in the fruit, making seed coats thinner and more permeable. This means they germinate more quickly.

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Will The World’s Rarest Primate Disappear Along With Its Forest?

Without more suitable habitat for gibbons to disperse into and form new social groups, the population size will ultimately not be able to increase, so forest availability across the Bawangling landscape and beyond is really key to their survival,

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Another New Plant Pollination Strategy: Fooling Food-Stealing Flies

The main pollinators of A. rotunda were female Chloropidae. They are food thieves that feed on secretions of true bugs (Miridae) while these are eaten by arthropod predators. Freshly killed mirids and Aristolochia flowers released the same scent components that chloropids use to find their food sources. Aristolochia exploits these components to deceive their chloropid pollinators.

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How Ben Franklin Used An Herb To Thwart Counterfeiters

Benjamin Franklin’s Philadelphia printing shop made plaster molds from pressed sage leaves to create metal stamps for marking foliage patterns on Colonial currency. The distinctive contours of leaf spines, stems and veins were meant to thwart counterfeiters, and Franklin’s workers managed to keep the casting technique a secret that has puzzled modern scholars, too.

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Is China’s Great Green Wall Of Trees Stopping The Desert?

Vegetation has improved and dust storms have decreased significantly in the Great Green Wall region, compared with other areas

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Toxins In Nectar And Pollen Affect Pollinators

This new study shows how plant chemicals can work in beneficial ways. “Plant chemicals in nectar and pollen can mediate specialisation in pollinators, can drive plant pollinator interactions and can simply be toxic to pollinators where they have been selected for another purpose in the plant, such as defence against herbivores,”

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Plants Adapting To Deer Browsing

Rampant deer have long been munching away on forest plants and altering ecosystems, but new evidence suggests some plants are evolving tolerance to being eaten.