Category Archives: Endangered Plants

0213001849

We’ve Got Good News And Bad News: Global Assessment Of Flora

Scientists have estimated that there are 390,900 plants known to science. The new tally is part of a report carried out by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. It is its first global assessment of the world’s flora. The study also found that 2,034 new plant species were discovered in 2015. However, the report warns that 21% of plants are at risk of extinction, with threats including climate change, habitat loss, disease and invasive species. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Popular Pesticides Harm Endangered Plants And Animals

Almost all of the 1,700 most endangered plants and animals in the US are likely to be harmed by two widely used pesticides, an alarming new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis has found. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Elm Trees’ Dating Service Helps The Species Save Itself

We’re trying to preserve enough diversity so the species can respond to this disease in as many ways as possible — so elms can continue to evolve as the disease evolves and as new threats develop, (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Magnolias, Celebrated Each Spring, Are Going Extinct

Nearly half (48%) of the magnolia species assessed are threatened with extinction in the wild. The Neotropics hold the highest proportion of threatened magnolias, with 75% of Neotropical magnolia species threatened with extinction. “Magnolias are an ancient group of trees that have survived epochs of global change. Now we stand to lose half of all species unless we take action to prevent extinction,” (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Iconic Plant Resists Efforts To Conserve It

Like many other carnivorous plants, the waterwheel has been heavily affected by habitat destruction and illegal collection. And a study now says that a common way of conserving plants – seed banks – might not work for this species. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

The Russian Cactus Rustler Caper: Tales From The Conservation Front Lines

The trial was quick. Safronov plead guilty. The multi-state surveillance investigation that pooled the investigative powers of four federal agencies and at least a dozen agents in five states would end in a fine. Safronov admitted to attempting to smuggle an object contrary to law, a misdemeanor, as well as to a civil import/export penalty. The judge ordered him to pay $525. Safronov flew home to Russia. And this time, the cacti remained. (Click on title or image for full story.)

0213001849

Fatal Beauty: Over Collecting ‘Everlasting’ Flowers Threatens Plants And People

Today, the mesmerizing flowers have become a potent symbol for a challenge facing Brazilian anthropologists: How can their knowledge of the lives of traditional people—including the migrant flower collectors—be used to help preserve the natural resources these people depend upon? And can a balance be struck between conservation and the economic needs of the people? (Click on title or image for full story)

0213001849

Seagrass, Vital To Slow Climate Change, Destroyed By Human Development

In Australia more than 80 per cent of the population lives along the coast and that’s placed enormous stress on our coastal marine ecosystems, particularly from extensive land clearing, agriculture and coastal development. (Click on title or image for full story.)

0213001849

What Is Lost? Newly Discovered Tropical Tree May Disappear Before It Is Studied

There is a real danger that this and other species will be lost to the world before they have even been properly investigated. Exploring the rainforest is not just fascinating, it is really, really urgent. *Click image of title for full story.)

0213001849

Ash Dieback Threatens More Than Trees

The light dappled shade beneath its canopy is ideal for many of the lichens that grow on tree bark and wood. Like elm, the bark of ash has a relatively high pH, a requirement for many lichens. Several of the more ‘demanding’ species that were severely affected by loss of habitat following Dutch Elm Disease found refuge on ash. Now they are further threatened. (Click on image or title for full story)