Category Archives: Climate Change

Decomposed Plant Parts Sequester Carbon In The Soil. How Long The Carbon Is Retained Depends On The Details

This research helps bridge the gap between studies of how leaves and other plant litter decompose and soil organic matter, which contains decomposed litter and other bio-based materials. The study builds this bridge by tracing how litter becomes soil organic matter over a decade. The results back a paradigm shift in our understanding of soil carbon research. The study does so by demonstrating that the long-term retention of litter-derived carbon and nitrogen in soil depends on where the litter lands. (Click on title for full story.)

Fossil Arctic Forests May Reveal Climate Change Future

“The geologic record shows us the beginning, middle and end of climate change events,With further study, we can better understand how greenhouse gases and climate change affect life on Earth. (Click on title for full story.)

Lemurs Dependent On Bamboo Risk Climate Caused Extinction

Future projections show that many present-day greater bamboo lemur populations will experience prolonged dry seasons similar to those of the localities where only fossils of the greater bamboo lemur are found. Whereas abundant foods such as bamboo allow feeding specialists to thrive, even a moderate change in seasonality may outstrip the capacity of greater bamboo lemurs to persist on their mechanically demanding food source. Coupling known changes in species distribution with high-resolution ecological and historical data helps to identify extinction risks. (Click on title for full study.)

Deforestation For Palm Oil Is Changing Indonesia’s Climate

Land use change from forest to cash crops such as oil palm and rubber plantations does not only impact biodiversity and stored carbon, but also has a surface warming effect, adding to climate change (Click on title for full story.)

Will Kelp Farming Slow Climate Change?

These marine plants and algae are sometimes called “sea vegetables”—but there are reasons beyond gastronomy to appreciate them. Kelp, in particular, has the potential to greatly reduce ocean acidification. Naturally occurring in cold, coastal marine waters, kelp grows quickly without the need for fertilizer, and it takes up carbon dioxide—which can exacerbate climate change—as well as excess nitrogen and phosphorus. The problem, though, is that there’s not enough of it. (Click on title for full story.)

New Study Underscores Value Of Nature In Controlling Climate Change

There’s a growing recognition that to get to below 2°C, we need to actively drawdown carbon from the atmosphere,” Adams says. “And while there’s lots of interest and investment in new technology solutions to capture and store carbon, this is new, experimental technology. Trees and other plants, meanwhile have already perfected this process over hundreds of millions of years of evolution—we’re unlikely to see a better carbon capture and storage technology than that which nature provides.” (Click on title for full story.)

Brown Fields + Plants = Long Term Carbon Sequestration

Although photosynthesis removes a significant amount of CO2 from the atmosphere annually, plant and soil respiration return most of the photosynthesised CO2 into the atmosphere, marking organic CO2 removal as an unstable sink. In contrast, SUCCESS (Sustainable Urban Carbon Capture through Engineering the Soil System) has shown that photosynthesised carbon can be fixed in soils as natural carbonate minerals. (CLick on title for full story.)

Toppled Baobabs Reveal History’s Secrets And Predict Climate Change Effects

Even before human activity started warming our world, climate variability in southern Africa  included these mega-droughts. It is doubtful that that the economy would survive such an occurrence today. Droughts are a clear part of the record, and they are always transient. Through history, and through climate research conducted on these baobabs, it is evident that conditions usually recover after drought. But can that be said for future conditions in a world affected by climate change? (Click on title for full story.)

North America’s Ubiquitous Ash Trees Declared Endangered

Five of the six most prominent ash tree species in North America enter The IUCN Red List as Critically Endangered – only one step from going extinct – with the sixth species assessed as Endangered. These species are being decimated by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer beetle(Agrilus planipennis). Three of them – Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), White Ash (Fraxinus americana) and Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra) – are the country’s most dominant ash trees, comprising nearly nine billion trees in the forested lands of the contiguous U.S. (Click on title for full story.)

Tundra Animals Help Off -Set Climate Change Impact On Plant Species

“We found that the warming increased the number of species in plots that were grazed, because it enabled small tundra plants to appear and grow there. But when we fenced reindeer, voles and lemmings out, vegetation became denser and the light was limited. As a result, many small and slowly-growing plant species were lost,” (Click on title for full story.)