Category Archives: Climate Change

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It Takes A Community. Some Plant Species Do Not Adapt To New Neighbors

If plants evolved to elevated carbon dioxide in one neighbourhood, then experienced elevated carbon dioxide in a different neighbourhood, the benefits disappeared. This result was very surprising to us. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

When Hybrids Are Better Able To Survive Change Than Their Parents Are

While hybrids might be expected to be a blend of the two parent species, the researchers found that they tended to have shorter and wider flower openings than both of the parent species which means that a wider range of pollinators can enter the flowers. By allowing a wider range of insects to pollinate them, hybrids make themselves much less vulnerable to the extinction of a single pollinator. (Click on title for full story.)

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Attacking The Problem: Control Tropical Vines To Preserve Carbon Sink

Scientists advocate the temporary removal of lianas in selected areas to help tropical forests grow back. (Click on title for full story.)

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The Death Of Underwater Forests

Before the heat wave, the kelps stretched over 800 kilometers of Australia’s western flank and cover 2,200 square kilometers. After the heat wave, Wernberg and Bennett found that 43 percent of these forests disappeared, including almost all the kelps from the most northerly 100 kilometers of the range. “It was just heartbreaking,” says Bennett. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Saltmarsh Restoration: Cost-Effective Strategy To Cope With Sea Level Rise

The restoration of currently occupied saltmarshes in temperate zones with an abundant input of sediments could be put forward as a strategy of cost-effective adaptation to counteract the effects of the rise in sea level. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Trees May Actually Instigate Rain

Since the experiment showed molecules of pinene naturally combining with one another when subjected to conditions that resembled those in the upper atmosphere, and since pinene is itself built of stuck-together isoprenes, it’s possible that the specific structure of the molecules isn’t as important as their general chemical makeup, consisting of multiple carbon atoms linked together into a long hydrocarbon. If so, this would be enormously significant—roughly 600 million tons of isoprene are released into the atmosphere each year by trees and shrubs. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Warming Climate Reduces Floral Scent, Leaving Pollinators Clueless

Increases in temperature associated with the changing global climate are interfering with plant-pollinator mutualism, an interaction facilitated mainly by floral color and scent. (Click on title for full story).

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Migrating Birds May Save Plants From Climate Change

This mechanism of long-distance dispersion had not been confirmed until now, mainly due to the difficulty involved in sampling propagules transported by birds during their migratory flight. We were able to analyse it thanks to the hunting behaviour of Eleonora’s falcons. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

As Climate Changes, A New Threat To Forests: Our Coffee Lust

The future demand for coffee and the impacts of climate change have the potential to make coffee production a future driver of deforestation, which could threaten the last remaining intact tropical forests and the services they provide: carbon storage, provision of fresh water, and biodiversity that aids in food provision. (Click on title for full story.)

0213001849

Bears May Save Some Plants From Climate Change

Mountain climbing by bears following spring-to-summer plant phenology is likely the cause of this biased seed dispersal. These results suggest that spring- and summer-fruiting plants dispersed by animals may have high potential to escape global warming. Our results also indicate that the direction of vertical seed dispersal can be unexpectedly biased, and highlight the importance of considering seed dispersal direction to understand plant responses to past and future climate change. (Click on title for full story.)